A new WNED-TV production, premieres Monday, May 4 at 9 p.m.

(repeats May 9 at 2:30 a.m. and May 10 at 3 p.m.)


Frederick Law Olmsted, America’s first and best-known landscape architect, created an enduring legacy in Western New York. Perhaps best known for his design of New York City’s Central Park, Olmsted had a powerful and lasting influence on Western New York.

“Frederick Law Olmsted: Designing Western New York” is a one-hour original WNED-TV production that captures the architect’s impact throughout Western New York. The program includes documentary segments that capture the history and context for Olmsted’s contributions and interviews with local experts that focus on how that legacy is being carried into the future.


Olmsted designed the Buffalo Park System, the first of its kind in the world. Buffalo is where Olmsted first coined the term “parkways” to describe the grand tree-lined boulevards that connected the three parks within the system.

While he was working in Buffalo, Olmsted visited Niagara Falls and was troubled by what he saw. Factories lined the rapids, and fences blocked the best views and allowed the charging of admission to see the falls. Olmsted’s support for the Free Niagara movement led to Niagara Falls becoming America’s first state park.

One of Olmsted’s allies in the Free Niagara movement was renowned architect H.H. Richardson. In 1880, Richardson completed work on the Buffalo State Asylum for the Insane, one of the best examples in America of the Richardson Romanesque architectural style. Olmsted and his partner Calvert Vaux designed the landscape for the 203-acre site.


“Frederick Law Olmsted: Designing Western New York” tells the story of all three of these Olmsted contributions. The program also provides a contemporary perspective on Olmsted’s enduring Western New York legacy by examining the current status of the Buffalo Park System, the restoration of Olmsted’s vision for Goat Island at Niagara Falls and the rebirth of what has become known as the Richardson Olmsted Complex.

The program includes interviews with Stephanie Crockatt, interim executive director, Buffalo Olmsted Parks Conservancy; Monica Pellegrino Faix, executive director, Richardson Olmsted Complex; Mark Thomas, director, Western District, New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation.

 

 

Find video, essays and classroom resources at www.pbs.org/wned/frederick-law-olmsted/home/ 

 
Watch a 2 minute preview of "Frederick Law Olmsted: Designing Western New York"

 

“Frederick Law Olmsted: Designing Western New York” is funded by the Margaret L. Wendt Foundation.

 

 

 

 

 

HSBC Water Programme - companion to "If Our Water Could Talk"

For HSBC, being sustainable means managing our business across the world for the long term. That means achieving sustainable profits for our shareholders, building long-lasting relationships with customers, valuing our highly committed employees, respecting environmental limits and investing in communities.

Protecting and preserving the environment is a key focus of our philanthropic and volunteer efforts. We are committed to finding ways to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce our impact on the environment and make our communities healthier places to live. We support varied initiatives and organizations that focus on environmental policy development, public awareness and education, and scientific research to improve the sustainability and resilience of eco-systems. 

Water is critical to eco-systems, and water is a huge and growing global challenge. It is essential to all human activity and a fundamental driver of socio-economic growth but, as a resource, it is under strain from population growth, development and climate change. It is because water is vital to building healthy communities and developing national economies that HSBC has chosen to invest its time and resources in the HSBC Water Programme. Launched in 2012 and backed by an investment of US$100 million over five years, the HSBC Water Programme is a partnership with three NGOs – WWF (World Wildlife Fund), WaterAid and Earthwatch. The programme will benefit communities in need and provide information for more efficient management of vital freshwater resources. To learn more, visit thewaterhub.org.

 

WNED ǀ WBFO Media Contact: Megan M. Wagner Director of Corporate Communications (716) 845.7155 • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. WNED ǀ WBFO to…

 

More than 22 percent of the city of Buffalo is water and the region lies within the largest fresh water system in the world. The abundance of fresh water is one of Western New York’s greatest resources.  WNED ǀ WBFO Buffalo-Toronto is introducing a multimedia project, If Our Water Could Talk, which will go in-depth into our area’s most valuable resource – water.

Media Contact:


Megan M. Wagner
WNED ǀ WBFO Director of Corporate Communications
(716) 845.7155 • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Press Releases:

  • WNED ǀ WBFO to Begin Multifaceted Initiative Focusing on Area Waterways
    WNED ǀ WBFO Media Contact: Megan M. Wagner Director of Corporate Communications (716) 845.7155 • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. WNED ǀ WBFO to…
    Written on Wednesday, 02 April 2014 20:12

 

Listening to the Water

Jill Jedlicka is the Buffalo Niagara Riverkeeper. She and her organization have done much of the legwork to help clean up the Buffalo River and other waterways around Western New York. The work done by Riverkeeper has been integral to the recovery of water all over the region. In her extended interview, Jill mentions "listening to the water."

After watching the extended interview with Jill Jedlicka, from Buffalo Niagara Riverkeeper, have a discussion with students about “listening to the water.”

1. What would Buffalo water say? Students should volunteer what they think our water might say. (ex. “please clean me,” “come swim with me,” “I remember when…,” etc.)
2. Talk about the different uses for our water (ex. For drinking, energy, transportation, recreation, etc.)
3. As a class, have students work together to create a large mural incorporating all the ways that we use Buffalo’s water.

 

 

 

Stanley Spisiak: A Voice for the Water

Stanley Spisiak was a local jeweler in Buffalo who had a passion for the outdoors and particularly for the water. He was an advocate for the waters of Western New York long before it was common or popular to speak out about environmental concerns. His actions laid the ground for the path to recovery of the Buffalo River and Lake Erie. Meet Spisiak and his grand-niece Jill Spisiak Jedlicka, who continues that work today.

Have your students watch the video segment Stanley Spisiak: A Voice for the Water. Stanley can be considered a hero. He stood up for what he believed in and action was taken.

1. What is the definition of a hero?
2. Who are the heroes in the student’s lives?
3. Has he or she ever acted as a hero? Did he or she cause action to be taken on some issue?
4. Write an essay on “When I Was a Hero.” If students were never in a hero situation, have them write about something they’d like to take a stand for. What would he or she do?

 

 

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