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Tuesday, 21 January 2014 20:40

Focus on Education

There is perhaps no issue more important to the future of Buffalo and Western New York than education.  WNED/WBFO’s Focus on Education initiative is a two year reporting and outreach project that will examine the many challenges facing schools today.  From the poor graduation rate in Buffalo to the controversy over Common Core Learning Standards throughout Western New York, our comprehensive coverage will inform and engage the community as it looks for the best solutions for students.

We will also examine the many efforts underway to improve education in Buffalo and Western New York, including programs such as Promise Neighborhood and Say Yes to Education.

This exciting initiative is funded by a grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and is part of American Graduate – Let’s Make It Happen! – a public media initiative to address the drop out crisis.

Focus on Education stories. 
 

 

Published in Programming Highlights

Grades 9-12 - 1-2 class periods

 

Program Segments

 

Objectives

Students will be able to:

  • Recognize who can become addicted to pain medications (anyone!)
  • Identify treatment options for drug addiction
  • Define recovery and rehabilitation

 

Instructional Resources

 

Vocabulary

Addiction, recovery, rehabilitation, treatment

 

Procedures

  1. Students will watch the Tragedy and Hope Stories of Painkiller Addiction segments.
  2. The facilitator will inspire a class discussion on what types of people the students think might become addicted to painkillers. It should be pointed out that anyone can become addicted. If time allows, the predisposition to addiction by genes may be touched upon. The facilitator should explain that recovery can happen, but it is a hard and lifelong commitment for addicts.
  3. Students should be given time to research these treatment options on a computer:
    1. outpatient (if a person does not comply, they may be forced to go to inpatient)
    2. inpatient (short-term or long-term)
    3. maintenance therapy (opioid replacement therapy)
    4. therapeutic communities (AA – Alcoholics Anonymous, NA – Narcotics Anonymous)
    5. diversion programs (drug courts)
  4. As they research, students should complete the Addiction Treatment Worksheet.
  5. After enough time for computer research, a class discussion should occur based on treatment options they discovered and learned about.
  6. Along with treatment, students will discuss what is needed for a “recovery lifestyle.” Healthy involvement in activities such as hobbies, sports, clubs in the community and school are recommended. The facilitator should point out that those options are great, but for an addict some of the components of a recovery lifestyle would be regularly talking with a counselor, regularly attending meetings, and staying away from other people who are using drugs. What other things can the students think of that might help with a recovery lifestyle?
  7. Students will then write a fictional story about someone who becomes addicted to prescription painkillers and what their road to recovery looks like. Students should include at least one treatment option and at least one recovery lifestyle change. They should be specific in explaining what it takes to commit to recovery.

 

Assessment Task

Students should be active participants in all class discussions. Students will turn in a completed Addiction Treatment Worksheet and a fictional story about an addict’s treatment plan and road to recovery.

 

National Health Standards

  • Standard 3 - Students will demonstrate the ability to access valid information, products, and services to enhance health.
  • Standard 6 – Students will demonstrate the ability to use goal setting skills to enhance health.
  • Standard 7 – Students will demonstrate the ability to practice health-enhancing behaviors and avoid or reduce health risks.
  • Standard 8 - Students will demonstrate the ability to advocate for personal, family, and community health.

 

The Science of Addiction

Treatment and Relapse

Published in Outreach & Education

Grade Levels 9 - 12 - Two class periods

 

Program Segments

 

Objectives

Students will be able to:

  • Understand most outcomes of prescription painkiller addiction as treatment, jail, or death
  • Recognize what decisions they could make to avoid prescription drug abuse consequences

 

Instructional Resources

 

Vocabulary

Consequences, decisions

 

Procedures

  1. The facilitator introduces the topic of prescription painkiller addiction. In some cases the exposure to the drugs is by the choice of an individual.
  2. Students will watch the Accessibility, Signs and Symptoms, and Treatment and Relapse segments from Tragedy and Hope Stories of Painkiller Addiction.
  3. The facilitator will distribute the Treatment, Jail, or Death Worksheet. The class will read the quote at the top of the worksheet and complete the section on what they think the quote means.
  4. The facilitator will start a discussion based on the quote and talk about the students’ comments and questions. Sometimes, inevitably, if you have an injury or condition, a doctor may prescribe medication for you. It should be made clear to the students that they need to be aware of the danger signs from taking the medication and also the ability to deny the medication if feasible.
  5. The facilitator will distribute the Decisions and Consequences Flow Chart. Briefly discuss that many people feel that prescription drugs are safe to take, but that is a misconception. If people begin with prescription drug use there may be a high chance of addiction with a limited number of outcomes:
    1. Treatment
    2. Jail
    3. Death
  6. Show the other segments of the program, Ryan’s Story and Avi & Julie’s Story.
  7. Have the students complete the rest of the Treatment, Jail, or Death Worksheet.
  8. Conclude the class with a discussion of their answers and any other concerns that they may have regarding prescription drugs.

 

Assessment Task

Students should actively participate in all class discussions and turn in a completed Treatment, Jail, or Death Worksheet.

 

Extension Activity

Have the students write a letter to a younger sibling or relative. They should describe the consequences of prescription drug abuse and addiction. Students should explain that there are decisions one can make and things one can do that will help them avoid inevitable consequences.

 

National Health Standards

  • Standard 1 – Students will comprehend concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention to enhance health.
  • Standard 2 – Students will analyze the influence of family, peers, culture, media, technology, and other factors on health behaviors.
  • Standard 4 – Students will demonstrate the ability to use interpersonal communication skills to enhance health and avoid or reduce health risks.
  • Standard 5 - Students will demonstrate the ability to use decision making skills to enhance health.
  • Standard 6 - Students will demonstrate the ability to use goal setting skills to enhance health.
  • Standard 7 - Students will demonstrate the ability to practice health-enhancing behaviors and avoid or reduce health risks.

 

Accessibility

Signs and Symptoms

Treatment and Relapse

Ryan's Story

Avi and Julie's Story

Published in Outreach & Education

Grades 9-12 - One class period

 

Program Segments

 

Objectives

Students will be able to:

  • Understand how drugs affect the brain
  • Relate drug addiction to other bodily needs

 

Instructional Resources

 

Vocabulary

Addiction, tolerance, withdrawal

 

Procedures

  1. Students will watch the Tragedy and Hope Stories of Painkiller Addiction segments featuring Ryan and Dr. Blondell.
  2. The facilitator will start a class discussion based on the program segments.
    1. In regards to Ryan’s Story – have any of the students felt compelled to act on a feeling? For example, have they ever felt compelled to continue eating even though they were full?
    2. Dr. Blondell’s Segment – how many students agree with the statement about “brains being on autopilot?” How does a person overcome “autopilot?” Can they?
  3. The facilitator will distribute the Quote Worksheet and students will review the quotes from the program given by Ryan and Dr. Blondell. 
  4. Students will complete the Quote Worksheet.

 

Assessment Task

Students should actively participate in the class discussion on decision making and how the brain works. Students will provide a written response to both of the quotes from Tragedy and Hope Stories of Painkiller Addiction on the Quote Worksheet.

 

Extension Activity

Have the students write a poem or song lyrics that contain their own analogy about addiction, hunger, and/or thirst and how the body and brain react to those needs.

 

National Health Standards

  • Standard 2- Students will analyze the influence of family, peers, culture, media, technology, and other factors on health behaviors.
  • Standard 5 - Students will demonstrate the ability to use decision making skills to enhance health.
  • Standard 7 - Students will demonstrate the ability to practice health-enhancing behaviors and avoid or reduce health risks.

Ryan's Story

The Science of Addiction

Published in Outreach & Education

Grades 9-12 - Four class periods

 

Program Segments

 

Objectives

Students will be able to:

  • Understand how people are able to obtain prescription drugs
  • Offer preventative measures to combat the control and supply of prescription medications

 

Instructional Resources

  • Tragedy and Hope Stories of Painkiller Addiction
  • ISTOP legislation article
  • Poster board
  • Markers, colored pencils, other art supplies
  • Access to computers with PowerPoint

 

Vocabulary

Opioids, over-the-counter drugs, prescription drugs

 

Focus Questions

  1. What policy or laws could be developed and enforced to combat prescription drug abuse?
  2. How can I help or possibly prevent someone abusing prescription drugs?
  3. How are prescription pain medications being illegally distributed and obtained?

 

Procedures

  1. Students will watch Tragedy and Hope Stories of Painkiller Addiction.
  2. The facilitator will ask the students to think about how Michael, Brandie, and Christopher were first able to obtain drugs. How can ANYONE obtain drugs? Answers will be written on a Smartboard, chalkboard, or paper large enough for the whole class to see. Students should include examples from the stories in the program.
    1. Michael obtained prescription drugs initially from his doctor for Crohn’s disease.
    2. Brandie initially got them from a friend at work.
    3. Consider old prescriptions at home, friends, doctors, and internet.
  3. In the second class period students will view the Accessibility program segment.
  4. The facilitator will distribute the article on the ISTOP legislation. Have a student or students read the article out loud. Have a discussion about this legislation. How will this combat prescription drug abuse?
  5. The students should then be split up into groups of 4 or 5. Using what they learned from the ISTOP legislation article and the list of ways to obtain drugs, each group will think about other possible solutions and or regulations as to how we can better control prescription drug abuse.
  6. In the third class period students will view the Parent Advocacy program segment.
  7. The students will develop an awareness campaign based on their ideas. Students will create posters and flyers for their idea. Depending on time availability and/or access to technology, groups may create videos to use in their campaign.
  8. In the fourth class period each group will present their ideas and awareness campaigns to the class. A PowerPoint presentation and other created materials will be shown.

 

Assessment Task

Students will develop an awareness campaign to combat prescription drug abuse. Groups of students will turn in posters and flyers. They will complete a class presentation using PowerPoint.

 

Extension Activities

  • Have the students write a letter to a politician (senator, council member etc.) sharing their ideas on how society can be more proactive in combating prescription drug abuse. What policy or laws could be put into effect that would help control the abuse of prescription medications?
  • Have the students develop a petition based on their prescription drug policy/laws ideas. They should share important information about prescription drug abuse with ten people (not in their class) and have them sign the petition.
  • Have students design a prescription drug-free pledge poster. Get other students in the school to sign the poster.

 

National Health Standards

  • Standard 1- Students will comprehend concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention to enhance health.
  • Standard 2- Students will analyze the influence of family, peers, culture, media, technology, and other factors on health behaviors.
  • Standard 8 – Students will demonstrate the ability to advocate for personal, family, and community health.

 

Entire Program

Accessibility

Parent Advocacy

Published in Outreach & Education