Wednesday, 03 December 2014 16:01

Buffalo's Black History - Web Resources

 

 Buffalo's Black History - Web Resources

These resources are to be used with the Buffalo's Black History Lesson Plans

Below are resources for the local African Americans:

Joseph Hodge
The Buffalonian Article
African American History of Western New York
First Resident of Buffalo

Clara L. Payne
Uncrowned Community Builders
Strangers in the Land of Paradise

Louis W. Roberts
Physicists of the African Diaspora
About: Inventors

Mary Elizabeth Vroman
Bright Road
BookRags
Encyclopedia of Alabama

Lucille Clifton
Modern American Poetry
Poets.org
The Circle Association
afropoets.net
Voices From the Gaps
The Library of Congress Webcast

Grover Washington, Jr.
last fm
Classic Motown

Bob Lanier
Basketball Hall of Fame
NBA

Ruben Santiago-Hudson
Hollywood.com
TV Guide

Jesse L. Martin
Biography
TV Guide

Brian McKnight
Brian McKnight Interactive
last fm 

Resources for more well known African Americans:

Colin Powell
Lucidcafe
Biography
Academy of Achievement

Martin Luther King, Jr.
Nobelprize.org
The King Center
History.com

Malcolm X
Spartacus Educational
The Official Malcolm X
History.com

Oprah Winfrey
Academy of Achievement
Oprah.com
Biography

Condoleezza Rice
Biography
Condoleezza Rice Fast Facts - CNN
Stanford

Aretha Franklin
Aretha Franklin
Aretha Franklin, Queen of Soul
Biography

Ray Charles
Official Website
Ray Charles, Genius of Soul
Biography

 

Below are sites categorized to give students an idea of the type of American art that was prominent during their selected local African American's lives:

Joseph Hodge: 1780s
Metropolitan Museum of Art
National Gallery of Art

Clara L. Payne: 1860-1958
Smithsonian American Art Museum - Picturing the 1930s
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Mary Cassatt
Art Noueau
John Singer Sargent
Winslow Homer

Louis W. Roberts: 1913-1995
Abstract Expressionism
Design 1900-25
Design 1925-50
Harlem Renaissance
Design 1950-75
Jackson Pollock

Mary Elizabeth Vroman: 1924-1967
Abstract Expressionism
Design 1925-50
Harlem Renaissance
Design 1950-75
Jasper Johns
Jackson Pollock

Lucille Clifton: 1936-2010
Abstract Expressionism
Design 1925-50
Harlem Renaissance
Design 1950-75
Jasper Johns
Jackson Pollock

Grover Washington, Jr.: 1943-1999
Abstract Expressionism
Design 1950-75
Jasper Johns
Jackson Pollock
Georgia O'Keefe
Mark Rothko

Bob Lanier: 1948-
Abstract Expressionism
Design 1950-75
Jasper Johns
Jackson Pollock
Georgia O'Keefe
Mark Rothko

Ruben Santiago-Hudson: 1957-
Design 1950-75
Design 1975-Present
Georgia O'Keefe
Mark Rothko
Andy Warhol
Art Since 1950

Jesse L. Martin: 1969-
Design 1975-Present
Andy Warhol
Art Since 1950
Keith Haring
Nancy Dwyer
William Wegman

Brian McKnight: 1969-
Design 1975-Present
Andy Warhol
Art Since 1950
Keith Haring
Nancy Dwyer
William Wegman

Monday, 24 November 2014 15:38

Target Prevention - Resources

 

The good news is we each hold a lot of power when it comes to our health. We have the unique opportunity to prevent, stall or lessen the impact of some diseases. Staying healthy is still a matter of the lifestyle choices we make.  Partner with your doctor and check with your insurance company to see what screening tests are appropriate for you and family members free of charge.

You’ll find tools and resources including a personal check-list here to help you keep track of tests, screenings and your numbers.

 

 

Your Role:

Preventive Services Covered Under the Affordable Care Act - U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Find out which preventive services must be covered without your having to pay a copayment or co-insurance or meet your deductible.

Everyday Healthy Living Quiz - healthfinder.gov
Find tips and suggestions to being and staying healthy.

Watch Your Weight - healthfinder.gov
A healthy diet and physical activity can help you control your weight. Also, check your Body Mass Index here.

Daily Food Plan - choosemyplate.gov
Want to know the amount of each food group you need daily? Enter your information to find out and receive a customized Daily Food Plan.

Nutrition Facts Label - Food and Drug Administration
The more familiar you are with nutrition label information, the more you’ll want to use it daily to ensure you’re eating a healthy, balanced diet.

Get Active! - healthfinder.gov
Regular physical activity is good for your health. Learn all the benefits, tips and activities.

Tips for Increasing Physical Activity
Make physical activity a regular part of the day.

Drink Alcohol Only in Moderation - healthfinder.gov
If you choose to drink, have only a moderate (limited) amount. Learn what the right amount is for you.

Quit Smoking - healthfinder.gov
Quitting smoking is one of the most important things you can do for your health. The sooner you quit, the sooner your body can start to heal.

New York State Smokers’ Quitline - The New York State Department of Health
Tobacco Control Program - myths and facts, quitting assistance and an online community.

Baby & Me - Tobacco Free
Free program to help pregnant women quit smoking and remain smoke-free.

My Life Check - The American Heart Association
Any person can make these changes, the steps are not expensive to take and even modest improvements to your health will make a big difference.

Preventive Guidelines PDF – Men - Independent Health
Use this chart to remind yourself when you or your loved ones might be due for a physical exam or lab test.

Preventive Guidelines PDF – Women - Independent Health
Use this chart to remind yourself when you or your loved ones might be due for a physical exam or lab test.

Preventive Guidelines PDF – Children - American Academy of Pediatrics
Recommendations for pediatric preventive health care.

$0 Preventive Services - Independent Health 
A list of FREE preventive services.

High Blood Pressure:

Get Your Blood Pressure Checked - healthfinder.gov
It’s important to check your blood pressure often, especially if you are over age 40.

10 Ways to Control High Blood Pressure Without Medication - The Mayo Clinic
By making these 10 lifestyle changes, you can lower your blood pressure and reduce your risk of heart disease.

Managing Blood Pressure With a Heart-Healthy Diet - The American Heart Association
Eating a heart-healthy diet is important for managing your blood pressure and reducing your risk of heart attack, heart disease, stroke and other diseases.

Type 2 Diabetes:

Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes - healthfinder.gov
You can do a lot to prevent or delay getting type 2 diabetes including watching your weight, eating healthy and staying active.

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test - American Diabetes Association
Interactive test to determine your risk.

My Health Advisor - American Diabetes Association (will not work on most mobile devices)
My Health Advisor calculates your risk then gives you a personalized action plan.

Colorectal Cancer:

Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer - healthfinder.gov
Talk with your doctor and ask about your risk for colorectal cancer. All it takes is a visit to the doctor to have a special exam (called a screening).

Colorectal Cancer Screening - National Cancer Institute
What is a colorectal cancer screening?

Colorectal Cancer Prevention and Early Detection - American Cancer Society
Find out more about these tests and about the risk factors for colorectal cancer here.

Breast Cancer:

Get Tested for Breast Cancer - healthfinder.gov
Mammograms can help find breast cancer early. Many women can survive breast cancer if it’s found and treated early.

Breast Cancer Screening Reminder - American Cancer Society
Sign up for a breast cancer screening reminder.

Breast Cancer Prevention - National Cancer Institute
Learn about risk and protective factors for breast cancer.

The Breast Cancer Network of Western New York
Education, advocacy, and support in Western New York.

 

Cancer Services Program of Erie County 
A statewide initiative that provides free breast, cervical, and colon cancer screenings and education to eligible, uninsured men and women.

New York State Department of Health
Find New York State related information and resources on various health topics.

Erie County Department of Health
Find Erie County related information and resources on various health topics.

Niagara County Department of Health
Find Niagara County related information and resources on various health topics.

 

 

Funding for  provided by
Published in Outreach & Education
Monday, 24 November 2014 15:37

Target Prevention - Cancer Prevention

 


Yes, it is possible to prevent some cancers! Screening tests are the key.

TARGET — Colorectal Cancer

Why Target? Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States when men and women are considered separately, and the second leading cause when both sexes are combined. We have a unique opportunity with colorectal cancer—screening tests allow us to find precancerous lesions so they can be treated before they become cancerous.

Screening Tests Several tests can be used to find colorectal cancer. Regular screening tests beginning at age 50 and continuing until age 75 are recommended. The Colonoscopy Test (considered the gold standard)- a long flexible tube check for polyps or cancer inside the rectum and colon. During the test, the doctor can remove polyps and some cancers.Talk to your doctor about earlier or more frequent testing if you have other risk factors including family history, inflammatory bowel disease or a generic syndrome.

Web resources:

Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer - healthfinder.gov
Talk with your doctor and ask about your risk for colorectal cancer. All it takes is a visit to the doctor to have a special exam (called a screening).

Colorectal Cancer Screening - National Cancer Institute
What is a colorectal cancer screening?

Colorectal Cancer Prevention and Early Detection - American Cancer Society
Find out more about these tests and about the risk factors for colorectal cancer here.

 

TARGET — Breast Cancer

Why Target? Breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women, except for skin cancers. About 1 in 8 (12%) women in the US will develop invasive breast cancer during their lifetime. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women. Screening tests can find cancer early, when it is easiest to treat and chances of survival are high.

Screening Tests There are three main tests are used to screen for breast cancer—mammogram, clinical breast exam and monthly self-breast exam. Mammograms are an x-ray of the breast. Mammograms are the best method to detect breast cancer early when it is easier to treat and before it is big enough to feel or cause symptoms. It is recommended that women have a mammogram every year beginning at age 40. A clinical breast exam by a doctor or nurse using their hands to feel for lumps or other changes is recommended every 3 years for women in their 20s and 30s and every year for women 40 and over. A monthly self-breast exam should be completed and a repot any changes to your doctor. Many breast cancers are first detected by self monitoring.

These screening tests allow us the unique opportunity to prevent cancer or discover it early when it is most treatable and beatable. Remember, like other preventive health services insurance coverage for screening tests for breast and colon cancer are required and covered by the Affordable Care Act.

Web resources:

Get Tested for Breast Cancer - healthfinder.gov
Mammograms can help find breast cancer early. Many women can survive breast cancer if it’s found and treated early.

Breast Cancer Screening Reminder - American Cancer Society
Sign up for a breast cancer screening reminder.

Breast Cancer Prevention - National Cancer Institute
Learn about risk and protective factors for breast cancer.

The Breast Cancer Network of Western New York
Education, advocacy, and support in Western New York.

 
Dr. Bousader-Armstrong “Target-Colon Cancer”

Dr. Nathalie Bousader-Armstrong from Niagara Falls Memorial Medical Center explains the importance of screening for colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, but it doesn’t have to be. Early detection results in better treatment or prevention.

Dr. Bousader-Armstrong “Target-Breast Cancer”

Dr. Nathalie Bousader-Armstrong from Niagara Falls Memorial Medical Center explains the importance of screening for breast cancer. About 1 in 8 women in the United States will develop invasive breast cancer during their lifetime. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women. Screening test allow us to detect breast cancer early when it is most treatable and beatable.

 

Funding for  provided by
Published in Outreach & Education
Monday, 24 November 2014 15:36

Target Prevention - Cardiovascular Health

 


There are screening tests that can show us signs of disease before symptoms present. Knowing your numbers (test/screening results) empowers you to become a true partner in your healthcare and can help motivate you to take ownership. The good news is all health insurance will cover preventive services like screening tests at no cost to you. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S. The concern comes down to inflammatory burden on the body caused by high blood pressure, high blood sugar and stress.

 

 

 

TARGET - High Blood Pressure

Why Target? Blood pressure is the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. High blood pressure can damage many parts of the body. If you have high blood pressure, you have a higher risk for stroke, heart disease, heart attack, and kidney failure. Controlling your blood pressure can reduce these risks.

Screening Test The only way to know whether your blood pressure is too high is to check it with a blood pressure monitor. Most people who have high blood pressure do not have any symptoms. This is why it's sometimes called “the silent killer.” Check yours regularly. The higher your blood pressure is, the more often you need to check it. A normal blood pressure is less than 120/80. High blood pressure is 140/90 or higher. If your blood pressure is between 120/80 and 140/90, you have what is called "prehypertension," which means that if you don’t take important steps, your elevated blood pressure can turn into high blood pressure.

Prevention/Treatment You and your doctor will work together to find the best way to lower your blood pressure. Treatment usually begins with monitoring your blood pressure and changes you can make to your lifestyle to help lower your blood pressure and reduce your risk of heart disease.

Web resources: 

Get Your Blood Pressure Checked - healthfinder.gov
It’s important to check your blood pressure often, especially if you are over age 40.

10 Ways to Control High Blood Pressure Without Medication - The Mayo Clinic
By making these 10 lifestyle changes, you can lower your blood pressure and reduce your risk of heart disease.

Managing Blood Pressure With a Heart-Healthy Diet - The American Heart Association
Eating a heart-healthy diet is important for managing your blood pressure and reducing your risk of heart attack, heart disease, stroke and other diseases.

 

TARGET - Type 2 Diabetes

Why Target? Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism that results in high blood sugar, high lipid levels and widespread disease. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious damage. Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the United States. There is strong correlation between cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Heart disease and stroke are the number 1 causes of death and disability among people with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure in adults. The risk of developing type 2 diabetes increases with age, obesity and lack of physical activity.

Screening Test A blood test can show if you have diabetes. Fasting Plasma Glucose is the preferred test. Diabetes is diagnosed at fasting blood glucose levels of greater than or equal to 126 mg/dl. If your blood glucose level is between 100mg/dl and 125mg/dl, you have what is called "prediabetes," which means that if you don’t take important steps, you may develop diabetes.
The American Diabetes Association recommends that all adults age 45 years and older be considered for diabetes screening by their health care provider every 3 years. Screening should be considered at a younger age or be carried out more frequently in individuals who are overweight (BMI 25 +) or have risk factors including family history, physical inactivity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, history of gestational diabetes and race/ethnicity.

Prevention/Treatment You and your doctor should work together to find the best way to manage and monitor your diabetes. Healthy eating, physical activity and blood glucose testing are the basic therapies for type 2 diabetes. Diet, exercise, maintaining a healthy weight and family history all play a role in your prevention. The risk of developing type 2 diabetes increases with age, obesity, and lack of physical activity. Type 2 diabetes is more common in individuals with a family history of the disease and in members of certain racial/ethnic groups.

Web resources:

Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes - healthfinder.gov
You can do a lot to prevent or delay getting type 2 diabetes including watching your weight, eating healthy and staying active.

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test - American Diabetes Association
Interactive test to determine your risk.

My Health Advisor - American Diabetes Association (will not work on most mobile devices)
My Health Advisor calculates your risk then gives you a personalized action plan.

   
Dr. Bousader-Armstrong “High Blood Pressure”

Dr. Nathalie Bousader Armstrong of Niagara Falls Memorial Medical Center explains the dangers of high blood pressure and the importance of knowing your number. Hypertension can lead to cardiovascular disease. Early detection results in better treatment or prevention.

Dr. Bousader-Armstrong “Target-Diabetes”

Dr. Nathalie Bousader Armstrong from Niagara Falls Memorial Medical Center explains the dangers of type 2 diabetes and the importance of screening and prevention. There is strong correlation between cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Diabetes remains the 7th leading cause of death in the United States. Early detection results in better treatment or prevention.

 

Funding for  provided by
Published in Outreach & Education
Monday, 24 November 2014 15:28

Target Prevention - Your Role

 

 

What are the most effective things you can do to take control of your health? The key to staying healthy and preventing disease is lifestyle. Small choices we each make everyday really do impact our health.

We’re all dealt a genetic hand of cards, a predisposition to certain diseases we cannot control. For most people, a healthy lifestyle trumps inherited risk--70-80% of disease is determined by lifestyle. Genetics loads the gun, but lifestyle pulls the trigger. Obesity, poor nutrition habits, smoking, lack of exercise or excessive drinking can send people down a path toward premature death despite good longevity genes.

 


The Basics

  • Stay at a healthy weight throughout life. One of the best ways to gauge weight is to determine your Body Mass Index (BMI) score, the relationship between your height and weight. A healthy weight should be a BMI below 25.
  • Be physically active on a regular basis. The recommendation for adult’s calls for at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity activity each week; walking briskly for this period of time is a good starting point.
  • Make healthy food choices with a focus on plant-based foods. Read food labels and choose foods that are low in fat and
    calories, watch portion sizes, stay away from processed foods. Aim for 2 ½ cups of fruits and vegetables, choose whole grains and purchase food grown locally in WNY. Quit smoking and limit Alcohol Intake. Consistency is everything. It’s not a short term sacrifice—it’s small changes that you incorporate into your lifestyle.

You are the captain of the ship, your lifestyle choices are plotting the course. When it comes to health you are the most important person—you have the primary role, your doctor and the health care system play a critical, but secondary role. Focus on working with your primary care provider, get tested and/or screened regularly, ask questions, follow a check list, and know your numbers.

 

Web resources to help you get started:

Preventive Services Covered Under the Affordable Care Act - U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Find out which preventive services must be covered without your having to pay a copayment or co-insurance or meet your deductible.

Everyday Healthy Living Quiz - healthfinder.gov
Find tips and suggestions to being and staying healthy.

Watch Your Weight - healthfinder.gov
A healthy diet and physical activity can help you control your weight. Also, check your Body Mass Index here.

Daily Food Plan - choosemyplate.gov
Want to know the amount of each food group you need daily? Enter your information to find out and receive a customized Daily Food Plan.

Nutrition Facts Label - Food and Drug Administration
The more familiar you are with nutrition label information, the more you’ll want to use it daily to ensure you’re eating a healthy, balanced diet.

Get Active! - healthfinder.gov
Regular physical activity is good for your health. Learn all the benefits, tips and activities.

Tips for Increasing Physical Activity
Make physical activity a regular part of the day.

Drink Alcohol Only in Moderation - healthfinder.gov
If you choose to drink, have only a moderate (limited) amount. Learn what the right amount is for you.

Quit Smoking - healthfinder.gov
Quitting smoking is one of the most important things you can do for your health. The sooner you quit, the sooner your body can start to heal.

My Life Check - The American Heart Association
Any person can make these changes, the steps are not expensive to take and even modest improvements to your health will make a big difference.

 

Dr. Sheriff "Know Your Numbers"

Dr. Fuad Sheriff from Amherst Medical Associates stresses the critical health numbers everyone should know. The key to staying healthy and preventing disease is in your hands.

Dr. Corigliano "Invest In Yourself"

Dr. Joseph Corigliano from Buffalo Medical Group explains the importance of lifestyle. The choices we make about how we live can have a significant effect on our health. When it comes to health you are the most important person—you have the primary role, your doctor and the health care system play a critical but secondary role.

 

Funding for  provided by

 

 

Published in Outreach & Education